introduce

introduce 1 *enter, admit
Analogous words: induct, install, inaugurate (see INITIATE): instill, inculcate, implant: infuse, inoculate, imbue
2 Introduce, insert, insinuate, interpolate, intercalate, interpose, interject mean to put something or someone in a place among or between other things or persons.
Introduce (see also ENTER 2) implies a bringing forward of someone or something not already in company with the other persons or things, but it also suggests as the aim of such an act the placing of the person or thing in the midst of that group or collection so as to form a part of it
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introduce a new subject into the conversation

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introduce several amendments into a bill before the legislature

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domestic science was introduced into the high school curriculum— Current Biog.

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Insert implies a setting of a thing in a fixed place between or among other things; thus, to insert lace in a garment is to put it between two pieces of the material which forms the garment; to insert leaves in a book is to put leaves into their proper places (as by the use of glue)
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insert additional words in a statement

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nowhere else, surely, can there be such a compulsion to make plays out of books, musicals out of plays . . . to insert scenes, delete characters— Kronenberger

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Insinuate (see also SUGGEST) implies a slow, careful, often gentle or artful introduction (as into or through a narrow or winding passage) by pushing or worming its or one's way
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the dog liked to insinuate his nose into his master's closed hand

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slang . . . has to insinuate itself into the language; it cannot pressure or push its way in— Sat. Review

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trees which insinuate their roots into the fissures of nearby rocks

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slowly but surely they insinuated themselves through the crowd to the edge of the pavement

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he couldn't quite insinuate the Huntingtons into American society, but he did pretty well for them in England— Behrman

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Interpolate implies the insertion of something that does not belong to and requires to be distinguished from the original, whether because it is extraneous to the subject under discussion or because it is spurious or simply because it is in fact not part of the original Although here and there, I omit some passages, and shorten others and disguise names, I have interpolated nothing— Le Fanu)
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he has interpolated editorial and critical comments of his own— Redman

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Intercalate primarily implies an insertion in the calendar (as of a day or month)
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since the calendar year contained only 355 days, an extra month was occasionally intercalated—R. H. Baker

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but in its extended sense it implies insertion into a sequence or series, then often also connoting intrusion
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lava beds intercalated between sedimentary layers of rock

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some of these discrepancies . . . are obviously due to the fact that Chaucer is intercalating stories previously written— H. S. Bennett

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Interpose (see also INTERPOSE 2) differs from interpolate mainly in its implication that what is inserted serves as an obstacle, obstruction, or cause of delay or postponement
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she actually interposed her body between him and the street door then, as though physically to prevent him from going— Ferber

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the early Church fought against the tendency to interpose objects of worship between God and man— Inge

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Professor Murray has simply interposed between Euripides and ourselves a barrier more impenetrable than the Greek language— T.S. Eliot

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Of all of these words, interject carries the strongest implication of abrupt or forced introduction
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he remained silent for the most part but occasionally interjected a question

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as they chewed on bones and roots, they paused to interject grunts of encouragement for the narrator— Mott

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The word is often employed in place of said in introducing a remark, statement, or question that comes more or less as an interruption or addition
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when he was talking about philosophers, I interjected what I feel confident was a tactful remark— Henderson

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Antonyms: withdraw: abstract
Contrasted words: *eject, oust, evict: eliminate, *exclude

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • introduce — in‧tro‧duce [ˌɪntrəˈdjuːs ǁ ˈduːs] verb [transitive] 1. to make a new product or service available for the first time: • The drug was introduced in the mid 1990s. 2. FINANCE to make stocks, shares etc available on the stock exchange for the first …   Financial and business terms

  • introduce — INTRODÚCE, introdúc, vb. III. tranz. 1. A face ca cineva sau ceva să intre, să pătrundă în ceva, undeva; a băga, a vârî. ♦ A include, a adăuga, a îngloba. ♦ refl. A intra undeva (cu forţa sau pe furiş). 2. A face ca o persoană să fie primită de… …   Dicționar Român

  • introduce — [in΄trə do͞os′, in΄trədyo͞os′] vt. introduced, introducing [L introducere < intro (see INTRO ) + ducere, to lead: see DUCT] 1. to lead or bring into a given place or position; conduct in 2. to put in or within; insert [to introduce an electric …   English World dictionary

  • Introduce — In tro*duce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Introduced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Introducing}.] [L. introducere, introductum; intro within + ducere to lead. See {Intro }, and {Duke}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To lead or bring in; to conduct or usher in; as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • introduce — [v1] make known; present acquaint, advance, air, announce, bring out, bring up, broach, come out with, do the honors*, familiarize, fix up, get things rolling*, get together, give introduction, harbinger*, herald, kick off, knock down, lead into …   New thesaurus

  • introduce — in·tro·duce vt duced, duc·ing: to present and offer (evidence) at trial Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. introduce I …   Law dictionary

  • introduce — ► VERB 1) bring into use or operation for the first time. 2) present (someone) by name to another. 3) (introduce to) bring (a subject) to the attention of (someone) for the first time. 4) insert or bring into. 5) occur at the start of. 6) provide …   English terms dictionary

  • introduce — (v.) early 15c., back formation from introduction, or else from L. introducere to lead in, bring in (see INTRODUCTION (Cf. introduction)). Related: Introduced; introducing …   Etymology dictionary

  • introduce — in|tro|duce W1S3 [ˌıntrəˈdju:s US ˈdu:s] v [T] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(when people meet)¦ 2¦(new system/product)¦ 3¦(bring something to a place)¦ 4¦(new experience)¦ 5¦(programme/public event)¦ 6¦(start a change)¦ 7¦(law)¦ 8¦(put something into something)¦… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • introduce */*/*/ — UK [ˌɪntrəˈdjuːs] / US [ˌɪntrəˈdus] verb [transitive] Word forms introduce : present tense I/you/we/they introduce he/she/it introduces present participle introducing past tense introduced past participle introduced 1) to tell someone another… …   English dictionary


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